Wednesday, 16 December 2020

The Church at Saint Hippolyte


Church, Saint Hippolyte, Indre et Loire, France. Photo by Loire Valley Time Travel.
The porch on the south side.

The church in the village of Saint Hippolyte was built in the 11th century (nave, choir and apse), then modified in the 15th century (facade) and again in the 16th century (south lateral door). The southern entrance is protected by a porch supported by oak posts and beams.

Church, Saint Hippolyte, Indre et Loire, France. Photo by Loire Valley Time Travel.
The solid and distinctive church of Saint Hippolyte.

On the south side, the belltower is 12th century but the stone spire, with its four corner dormers, was added in the 15th century. There is also a round arched window with colonnettes at the level of the bell. Supporting the belltower are some solid buttresses.

Church, Saint Hippolyte, Indre et Loire, France. Photo by Loire Valley Time Travel.
The belltower.

Church, Saint Hippolyte, Indre et Loire, France. Photo by Loire Valley Time Travel.
Carpentry on the porch.

Church, Saint Hippolyte, Indre et Loire, France. Photo by Loire Valley Time Travel.
The north side and western end of the church.

Church, Saint Hippolyte, Indre et Loire, France. Photo by Loire Valley Time Travel.
Idle school kid with a compass waiting for the bus; witch marks; or sundials [link]? My money is on witch marks [link].

Lateral door, church, Saint Hippolyte, Indre et Loire, France. Photo by Loire Valley Time Travel.
16th century lateral door.

 


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5 comments:

Jean said...

There are some of those engraved circular patterns at our house. I often wondered what they meant.

Susan said...

Once you know about them you realise they are all over the place. We have one on our bedroom window. Friends have dozens all overlapping on their back entrance (a particularly vulnerable place of course). My guess is that most of them are 19C.

chm said...

Strangely interrsting little church.

Jean said...

Ours are at the entrance to the well house which we think was an addition to the property and built around a formerly outdoor well. Also on the stones at the barn door. I don't think there are any to the actual house, although we think some of those stones have been replaced in the past so the marks may have disappeared.
Fascinating stuff.

Susan said...

It's a very distinctive looking church, with the roof line that continues over the porch, and the heavy stone tower to one side. I was surprised at how little I could find out about it -- nothing more than a description and some rough dates -- all of which I could more or less have observed for myself.

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