Wednesday, 16 March 2016

What's Unusual About This Scene?


Early March sees the beginning of the season of outings and events for the classic car club that we belong to. These photos are from the annual swap meet (Fr. bourse) at Noyers sur Cher (just across the river from Saint Aignan). An aperitif for members who are attending is being prepared. The golden squares in the plastic box above are either goats cheese puff pastries or potato cakes. Below, the new president of our chapter of La Traction Universelle, Jean-Marc, cuts up a savoury bread. The drinks include some sparkling wine, some homegrown homemade pear juice and a rosé from Joel Delaunay. He is a winemaker from Pouillé, not far away from where this meet was taking place, and a lot of the club members buy wine from him.


So what is it that is so unusual about this scene?

8 comments:

  1. The screw-top is the rosey....
    I've noticed more and more rosey being sold in screwtops...
    as it is meant to be drunk within the year, it is probably both effective and cheap for the vigneron to do this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are right. Rosé is the perfect choice for the vignerons to get the consumer used to them. Rosé is not a wine people take seriously.

      Delete
  2. If you are wondering who Quinton is it was Colin, Elizabeths son must have left himself logged in!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I just thought we had a reader from Lancashire delurking. It didn't occur to me that it was you guys. Doh!

      Delete
  3. Screw tops have been around for so long in Australia I didn't see it as different! Took a while to get acceptance but is now commonplace.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not just commonplace, but the norm. I had kind of the opposite experience when I was in Australia a few years ago. I bought a bottle of wine then got back to the apartment and searched for a corkscrew. Panic for a moment when I realised there wasn't one, but of course, the bottle was a screwcap. I hadn't looked or noticed, I just expected it to be a cork because that's what I'm used to.

      Delete