Tuesday, 12 November 2019

Fungi Foray in the Forest of Loches November 2019


The 5 November fungi foray to the Forest of Loches was led by Didier Raas, a pharmacist from Loches. He leads outings a couple of times a year to teach anyone who chooses to turn up about how to identify mushrooms, and best practice when foraging. Outings are often in partnership with the Association de botany and de mycology de Sainte Maure de Touraine. They are advertised in the local press and at the Tourist Office in Loches. He's leading another one today in the Forest of Preuilly, from 9.30 am.

Fungi foragers gather in the car park of the Pyramide de Saint Quentin.
Fungi foragers gather before an outing.  Indre et Loire, France. Photographed by Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.

A dry rot Serpulaceae (Fr. mérule) growing on a stump. Not the species that can damage your house.
A dry rot Serpulaceae growing on a stump in the forest.  Indre et Loire, France. Photographed by Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.

Cream coloured 'milk' forming on the gills of Oak Milkcap Lactaria quietus (Fr. Lactaire tranquille) after they are touched. This species smells strongly of bedbugs or wet laundry.
'Milk' forming on the gills of Oak Milkcap Lactaria quietus.  Indre et Loire, France. Photographed by Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.

A slime mould Myxomycetes (Fr. Myxomycète).
A slime mould Myxomycetes.  Indre et Loire, France. Photographed by Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.

A curtain crust Stereum sp (Fr. une stérée).
A curtain crust Stereum sp.  Indre et Loire, France. Photographed by Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.

Dominique explaining how to identify Death Cap Amanita phalloides (Fr. Amanite phalloïdes),
 the most toxic mushroom in the forest.
An experienced fungi forager explains how to identify Death Cap Amanita phalloides.  Indre et Loire, France. Photographed by Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.

Bicoloured Deceiver Laccaria bicolor (Fr. Laccaire bicolore).
These can be found everywhere, in the forest and in damp grass in light woodland such as orchards.
They are abundant and a mushroom you most likely see every day.
Bicoloured Deceiver Laccaria bicolor.  Indre et Loire, France. Photographed by Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.

Mostly bracket fungi. Includes Strict-branched Coral Ramaria stricta (Fr. Clavaire dressée),Variable Oysterling Crepidotus variabilis (Fr. Crépidote variable), Turkey Tail Trametes versicolor (Fr. polypore versicolore) and Lingzhi Mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (Fr. Reishi). The latter is made into a syrup used in Traditional Chinese Medicine for the usual plethora of ailments.
Mostly bracket fungi.  Indre et Loire, France. Photographed by Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.

The mushrooms are laid out in their family groups at the end of the outing to be identified. 
Amanita spp left foreground, Russula spp right foreground.
Mushrooms being sorted into family groups at the end of a fungi foray.  Indre et Loire, France. Photographed by Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.

Didier showing the two groups of mushrooms that have pores (not gills, like 'supermarket' mushrooms). Bracket fungus on the left, Bolete on the right.
An expert mycologist teaching fungi foragers about species with pores.  Indre et Loire, France. Photographed by Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.

Didier holding an Edible Cep Boletus edulis (Fr. Cèpe de Bordeaux) and explaining how to recognise this prized edible species. Other edible boletes on the left hand end of the table.
An expert mycologist holding an Edible Cep Boletus edulis at a training session for fungi foragers.  Indre et Loire, France. Photographed by Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.


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2 comments:

Le Pré de la Forge said...

I like the name "Turkey Tail" for Trametes versicolor... it is actually far more descriptive than the "Artist's Pallet" I grew up with.
Trametes versicolor was the first scientific name I ever learnt... along with Phallus impudicus....

Susan said...

I like Turkey Tail better, and I think Artist's Palette is applied to some other species. And of course Phallus impudicus was first -- irresistible.

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