Wednesday, 1 May 2019

Wild Flowers of Saint-Epain, Part II


Part I is here.

Photograph Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.
Narrow-leafed Helleborine Cephalanthera longifolia (Fr. Céphalanthère à longues feuilles).

Photograph Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.
Purple Gromwell Lithospermum purpureocaeruleum (Fr. le Grémil pourpre-bleu).

Photograph Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.
Yellow Archangel Lamium galeobdolon (Fr. Lamier jaune).

Photograph Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.
Wood Anemone Anemone nemorosa (Fr. Anémone des bois).

Photograph Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.
Lily-of-the-valley Convallaria majalis (Fr. Muguet).

Photograph Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.
Violet Limodore Limodorum abortivum (Fr. Limodore à feuilles avortées).

Photograph Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.
Ivy-leaved Toadflax Cymbalaria muralis (Fr. Cymbalaire).

Photograph Susan Walter. Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.
Rue-leafed Saxifrage Saxifraga tridactylites (Fr. Perce-pierre).


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12 comments:

Colin and Elizabeth said...

We always enjoyed our walks around Saint-Epain, it is a very nice area. interestingly I remember there being an abundance of flowers. We will have many pictures - Its just finding them!!

chm said...

Cymbalaria muralis, better known in France as Ruine-de-Rome. Note the hyphen on each side of de.

Sheila said...

I'm a big fan of ivy-leaved Toadflax (aka Kenilworth Ivy) and went to great lengths to cultivate it when living in California. Wonderful in hanging baskets.

Susan said...

I generally use the vernacular name recommended on Tela Botanica. Ruine-de-Rome is listed as a secondary or regional name.

Susan said...

Having a database for the photos helps a lot, but it took Simon a long time to find one that was suitable, and he's dreading having to switch to Windows 10 because the two are not compatible.

Susan said...

Another plant that Americans have a different vernacular name for. I've only recently discovered that many Americans call the deciduous species of magnolia 'Tulip Trees', which to me is something else entirely.

chm said...

Susan, which Tulip tree are you refering to? It seems there are at least two trees going by that name: Liriodendron tulipifera and Magnolia soulangeana. Both are everywhere in Arlington.

Here is what I found about Soulangeana:
One thing to note is that although this tree is sometimes referred to as a tulip tree, there is another tree called by the same common name. To avoid confusion, it’s best to refer to the saucer magnolia by that name. The true tulip tree is Liriodendron tulipifera and is a much larger tree that has tulip-shaped leaves with big yellow blossoms. Also, there is yet another type of magnolia that is in the magnolia genus that is an evergreen tree that has glossy leaves, white flowers and red cones.

Rhodesia said...

Another interesting post. I planted Lily of the valley earlier this year and nothing is growing!! Have a good day, Diane

Susan said...

Tulip trees to me are Liriodendron. A number of Americans I have encountered recently refered to the deciduous magnolias that were flowering here in April as Tulip trees. The magnolias in question may or may not have been M. soulangeana -- there are so many species and varieties of deciduous magnolia it's hard to keep track.

Susan said...

Lily of the Valley seems to love its conditions and spread obligingly, or it hates it and does nothing at all. Nothing in between.

chm said...

Pour la petite histoire, le créateur de l'hybride Magnolia x soulangeana, Étienne Soulange-Bodin, était le grand-père d'un ami d'enfance de mon père!

Susan said...

Three degrees of separation...

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