Monday, 23 September 2019

Un Galopin


At the end of a very hot 10km walk the other day we all repaired to the bar in Barrou. Simon and I had Perrier Fines Bulles (small bubbles), Pauline had a demi-pêche (a beer with peach syrup), Jim had a panaché (shandy) and Dominique ordered a galopin.

Photographed by Susan Walter.  Tour the Loire Valley with a classic car and a private guide.

I'd never heard of a galopin in this context before so I quizzed her as to what it was. She described it as a demi-demi ie half a half. Meaning it was 125 ml or an eighth of a litre. Beer from the tap normally comes in half litre glasses and are known as chopes. A demi is 250 ml. The closest Australian equivalent to a galopin would be a pony.


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5 comments:

Colin and Elizabeth said...

The UK equivalent used to be called a gill. Not used now but I always thought it was half a pint BUT https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gill_(unit). I can remember my late father using the expression "I am going for a Gill" when going to his local pub.

Nicole Crawford said...

I thought a galopin was 150ml?

And I thought a gill was one of the metal measures behind the bar for measuring spirits..a gill being one the larger ones for sherry etc..

However working on Sunday morning in a small Surrey social club ws a long time ago and that was the last time I ever measured sherry..my Mum and I enjoy it in a wine glass!

Nicole Crawford said...

Ok looks like I am wrong on both counts!

Astonishing how outdated measures have just been upsized, wine and beer got stronger too..cheers

The 1963 Act formalized the legal measures by which spirits and other alcoholic beverages should be dispensed, namely 1/4 gill (35.5 ml), 1/5 gill (28.4 ml) or 1/6 gill (23.7 ml), but this was replaced in 1985 by 25ml for single measures, with double measures of 50ml being permitted.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org › wiki
Alcoholic spirits measure - Wikipedia

Susan said...

I thought a gill was half a pint too. I'm sure I've got a measuring jug that shows that.

Susan said...

Drinks measures and especially colloquial names for them are so complicated.

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